How the body guides emotions – The Wearables Project

Approximately 1 in 45 Australians will experience an acquired brain injury (ABI) that has long-term functional consequences. As the leading cause of disability in young adults, ABI can significantly alter individuals’ life trajectories.

Difficulty recognising and regulating one’s emotions (i.e. emotion regulation) underlies mood dysfunction after ABI. However, existing research has largely relied upon self-report measures of emotion regulation. To date, there is a lack of research on the measurement of emotion regulation during more naturalistic tasks (e.g. receiving feedback on one’s abilities) and the combined use of subjective (self-report) and objective or performance-based measures of emotion regulation.

Wearable technologies, such as wristbands, have the potential to provide objective measures of emotional arousal and regulation through monitoring physiological changes. These non-obtrusive devices offer real-time data on sympathetic nervous system activity. This project aims to understand the usefulness of wearable technology for measuring changes in the body (heart and skin activity) and emotions that people experience as they complete tasks that are often used in brain injury rehabilitation.

If you live within South-West Queensland, Griffith University is seeking people to take part in the study to understand the usefulness of wearable technology for measuring changes in the body and emotions that people experience as they complete tasks that are often used in brain injury rehabilitation. For further detailed information or to register please click here.